Tag Archives: spanish to english translation

23 Spanish words that do not have a translation in English

While English and Spanish have some commonalities, and most Spanish words have a direct one word translation in English, there are a few words in Spanish that do not have a corresponding single word in English. Here are 23 Spanish words that do not have a translation in English:

1. Estrenar
To wear or use something for the first time.

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2. Pelada
A pick up soccer game. Literally it means peeled or bare. I believe it’s used in South America.

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3. Botellón (n)
Open-air drinking session, typically among youths. People bring their own alcohol which is bought from stores, making it a cheap alternative to going to bars or night clubs.

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4. Enmadrarse (v)
For a child to become attached excessively to his/her mother.

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5.  Friolero (n)
A person who is especially sensitive to cold weather and temperatures

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6. Gentilicio (n)
A word to describe the inhabitants of a country or city

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7. Pardo (a)
A brownish gray, like the color of an owl.

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8. Puente (n)
A long weekend where you’ve added a day between the weekend and the holiday.  So if the holiday is on a Tuesday, and you take Monday off, you’ve made a puente to get a four-day weekend

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9. Sobremesa (n)
The time spent after lunch or dinner talking to the people you shared the meal with

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 10. Tuerto (a)
One-eyed, or blind in one eye.

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11. Desvelado (a)

Tired, but specifically from having been kept awake or kept from sleeping well the prior night.

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12. Consuegro (n)
The relationship between people whose children are married to each other. i.e. My father and my father-in-law are consuegros.

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13 . Amigovio/a
A friend with benefits; a combination of amiga/o and novia/o.

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14. Te quiero
A way to tell someone you care about them. Particularly when romance is involved, more meaningful than an “I like you” but less meaningful than an “I love you.” May be used as “I love you” in non-romantic relationships.

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15. Duende
A climactic show of spirit in a performance or work of art, often applied to flamenco dancing or bull-fighting. A moment of inspiration.

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16. Pena Ajena
Shame experienced on behalf of another person, even though that person may not experience shame.

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17. Antier/Anteayer
A one-word way of saying the day before yesterday. A shorter version of ‘ntes de ayer.’

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18. Embalagarse
The sensation your tongue has after eating too many sweets. It the feeling you get when you need some milk to go with that chocolate cake.

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19. Atolondrar
To become so overwhelmed by something that you get scatter-brained and do something careless. For example, if you are being bombarded by emails, phone calls, text messages, etc, all at the same time, while trying to write an email, that you become so overwhelmed that you send it without an attachment.

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20. Tocayo
A person who has the same name as you

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21. Soler (v)
To be in the habit of doing something or accustomed to doing it.

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22. Pavonear (v)
To strut about like a peacock, to be showy and ostentatious.

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23. Concuñado (n)
Your brother’s brother-in-law. Though it can be used in the feminine form too. Cuñado/a of course being the word for brother-in-law or sister-in-law.

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